Almanac Data Tables

Aries, Sun, and Moon

2019 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2018 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2017 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Planets

2019 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2018 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2017 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Navigational stars with magnitude ≤ 1.5

2019 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2018 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2017 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Lunar Distance Tables

Lunar Distance Tables with one-hour intervals for up to 5 celestial bodies, including Proportional Logarithms

2019 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2018 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2017 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Lunar Distance Tables with one-hour intervals for up to 7 celestial bodies

2019 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2018 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2017 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Explanation

Which table which with Proportional Logarithms can be used with the Lunar Distance Tables?

Use this Proportional Logarithm Table for one-hour intervals.

For which celestial bodies is the lunar distance shown?

On the page with almanac data the lunar distance is shown if the following requirements are met: See also Steven Wepster's website for rules to decide whether the lunar distance is practically relevant. On his website you can also find tables with lunar distances with 3-hour intervals for the years 2007 to 2015 that are in the same format as the tables in the 19th century Nautical Almanac. The format of the lunar distance tables on this website is almost the same, except that the interval is 1 hour instead of 3 hours.
On the NavList community website I asked a question about when to display lunar distances. With a subject & author search for "lunar distance" you can easily find replies to this question. I thank the other community members for their suggestions!

How are the celestial bodies in the Lunar Distance Tables selected?

For each day, a celestial body was selected if the requirements mentioned in the previous question were met at 0:00 UTC. The selected celestial bodies were then assigned a score using a weighted sum of the following parameters: Two celestial bodies, A and B, have the same score if the lunar distance of A is 10° larger than that of B, and the change of lunar distance of A is 1' of arc larger than that of B. The celestial bodies with the highest scores were selected, where at least one celestial body with increasing and decreasing lunar distance was selected.

What do the '+' and '-' sign in front of the names of the celestial bodies in the Lunar Distance Tables mean?

The '+' or '-' sign in front of the name of the celestial body indicates whether the lunar distance is increasing or decreasing with time, respectively. The '+' or '-' sign also indicates whether the celestial body is west or east of the moon, respectively.

Why is the lunar distance in the Lunar Distance Tables not always shown for all hours of the day?

When the moon passes a celestial body close by, the lunar distance changes nonlinearly. As a consequence, a linear interpolation of the lunar distance is not very accurate anymore. If the maximum error that is made by using a linear interpolation exceeds 0.1' the lunar distance is not shown. For an explanation, click here.